nevver:

Being John Malkovich, Sandro Miller

(Source: sandrofilm.com, via acrylicalchemy)

This was posted 5 hours ago. It has 5,281 notes.

camillessketchbook:

theladybadass:

From 1995 documentary, Unzipped. In this scene, Eartha Kitt explains (in her unique way) to designer Isaac Mizrahi that she needs a gown she can move in.

yes eartha

This was posted 5 hours ago. It has 8,512 notes.

(Source: grrrlgoneriot, via hex-girlfriend)

This was posted 10 hours ago. It has 9,223 notes. .

(Source: weheartit.com, via acrylicalchemy)

This was posted 10 hours ago. It has 821 notes. .
These atheist activists are the sort of people who want to use my story as proof that religion is horrible to women but aren’t willing to listen to what I have to say about sexism in our culture at large. They are the sort of people who are eager to use the shooting of young education activist Malala Yousafzai by the Taliban to prove how horrible religion is for women but somehow fail to mention that Malala is a Muslim who speaks of drawing her inspiration to fight for gender equality from the Koran. This is not standing up for women. This is exploiting women as merely a tool in a fight against religion.

Libby Anne, Do They Care About Women, or Simply Bashing Religion? (via entanglingbriars)

I think this is important, but I don’t believe it has anything to do with atheism as an ideology. I’d love it if it turned out that abandoning religion(or certain types, anyway) would lead to gender equality, as at least that would make for an easy solution. Turns out that misogyny, like most everything else, is frustratingly complicated. 

(via liberalchristian)

(via lipstick-feminists)

This was posted 11 hours ago. It has 266 notes.
lesbianspaceprincex:

let-them-eat-vag:

ashoutintothevoid:

Emma Sulkowicz is on the cover of this month’s New York Magazine and that is the coolest thing wow

DUUUUDE this is a huge fucking deal honestly

I just want to put out there that Princess, an AfroLatina trans woman at Temple University, also talks about how her university downright refused to investigate her rape even though medics and police officers were there after the assault, and let her rapist walk away unquestioned.Source (x), which much more details.
Please use the momentum of this story to help multiply marginalized women, especially those who are getting absolutely *no* support or attention for the violence they are surviving.

lesbianspaceprincex:

let-them-eat-vag:

ashoutintothevoid:

Emma Sulkowicz is on the cover of this month’s New York Magazine and that is the coolest thing wow

DUUUUDE this is a huge fucking deal honestly

I just want to put out there that Princess, an AfroLatina trans woman at Temple University, also talks about how her university downright refused to investigate her rape even though medics and police officers were there after the assault, and let her rapist walk away unquestioned.
Source (x), which much more details.

Please use the momentum of this story to help multiply marginalized women, especially those who are getting absolutely *no* support or attention for the violence they are surviving.

(via lipstick-feminists)

This was posted 11 hours ago. It has 187,503 notes. .
bremser:

Update: The film “Fruitvale Station" opens this week, which is a dramatized account of Oscar Grant’s last day, December 31, 2008 - January 1, 2009. I haven’t seen the film yet, so I don’t know if the moment when Grant photographs his killer is depicted in the film. The following interview was first published January, 2011.
Oscar Grant’s photograph of Johannes Mehserle
Oscar Grant’s photograph of transit police officer Johannes Mehserle is rare: a portrait of the photographer’s killer. Unlike the recent photograph that a politician captured in the Philippines, Grant’s photograph, taken moments before Mehserle shot him in the back, was intentional.
Much of the media attention given to the Oscar Grant case focused on a handful of videos made by other passengers on the BART train, some of which show Grant being shot. While being detained by BART police, Grant called his ex-girlfriend Sophina Mesa twice from the platform. During this time he also took the photo of Mehserle and sent it to Mesa. Grant’s photograph of Mehserle did not get as much coverage as the videos, as it wasn’t released until the trial began.
Grant’s photograph raises an important issue that faces every American: the right to photograph, videotape and document while being detained or arrested by the police. Many of us assume we have this right, but with existing wiretapping laws, you can still be arrested and your camera confiscated. Radley Balko’s Reason.com article “The War on Cameras” is essential reading on this subject.
Demian Bulwa is a reporter and editor for the San Francisco Chronicle, who has covered the Oscar Grant case since the shooting, through the entire Mehserle trial. I asked him a few questions over the phone about this photograph.
How did the prosecution and defense use this photograph as evidence in the trial?
Both sides used flat screen TVs, multimedia, everything was timed and choreographed. It seemed they felt they might lose credibility if they weren’t sharp with multimedia. At times the arguments felt like PowerPoint presentations. There were photos, quotes, videos, video of the Taser training.
It was used by prosecution to show two things: 1. that he [Mehserle] knew his Taser from his gun, that he had actually taken out his Taser twice, that he knew full well between the two weapons. 2. That Oscar was being abused and was concerned about it.
It was one of many pieces of evidence. It’s part of the puzzle, and hard to tell which ones stuck with the jury.
What facts were presented about the photograph, when it was taken? Did he take it while face down, turning around?
Grant was sitting on the ground. The guys were sitting on the edge of the platform for a while. He wouldn’t have had the opportunity in the last moments, the officers were on top of him, with his arms behind him.
Was there any suggestion by either side that taking this photograph provoked Mehserle, or was some form of resisting arrest?
I don’t recall.
Based on the evidence in the trial, and your own speculation, why do you think Oscar Grant took this photograph?
Most likely he was documenting unfair treatment. He said something to his girlfriend [during the phone call], like “I’m getting beat up here.” It was a way of documenting that, and putting Mehserle on notice. If you take a picture of someone you are saying: I’m watching your behavior. You’re accountable. You are expressing your concern and putting them on notice.

bremser:

Update: The film “Fruitvale Station" opens this week, which is a dramatized account of Oscar Grant’s last day, December 31, 2008 - January 1, 2009. I haven’t seen the film yet, so I don’t know if the moment when Grant photographs his killer is depicted in the film. The following interview was first published January, 2011.

Oscar Grant’s photograph of Johannes Mehserle

Oscar Grant’s photograph of transit police officer Johannes Mehserle is rare: a portrait of the photographer’s killer. Unlike the recent photograph that a politician captured in the Philippines, Grant’s photograph, taken moments before Mehserle shot him in the back, was intentional.

Much of the media attention given to the Oscar Grant case focused on a handful of videos made by other passengers on the BART train, some of which show Grant being shot. While being detained by BART police, Grant called his ex-girlfriend Sophina Mesa twice from the platform. During this time he also took the photo of Mehserle and sent it to Mesa. Grant’s photograph of Mehserle did not get as much coverage as the videos, as it wasn’t released until the trial began.

Grant’s photograph raises an important issue that faces every American: the right to photograph, videotape and document while being detained or arrested by the police. Many of us assume we have this right, but with existing wiretapping laws, you can still be arrested and your camera confiscated. Radley Balko’s Reason.com article “The War on Cameras” is essential reading on this subject.

Demian Bulwa is a reporter and editor for the San Francisco Chronicle, who has covered the Oscar Grant case since the shooting, through the entire Mehserle trial. I asked him a few questions over the phone about this photograph.

How did the prosecution and defense use this photograph as evidence in the trial?

Both sides used flat screen TVs, multimedia, everything was timed and choreographed. It seemed they felt they might lose credibility if they weren’t sharp with multimedia. At times the arguments felt like PowerPoint presentations. There were photos, quotes, videos, video of the Taser training.

It was used by prosecution to show two things: 1. that he [Mehserle] knew his Taser from his gun, that he had actually taken out his Taser twice, that he knew full well between the two weapons. 2. That Oscar was being abused and was concerned about it.

It was one of many pieces of evidence. It’s part of the puzzle, and hard to tell which ones stuck with the jury.

What facts were presented about the photograph, when it was taken? Did he take it while face down, turning around?

Grant was sitting on the ground. The guys were sitting on the edge of the platform for a while. He wouldn’t have had the opportunity in the last moments, the officers were on top of him, with his arms behind him.

Was there any suggestion by either side that taking this photograph provoked Mehserle, or was some form of resisting arrest?

I don’t recall.

Based on the evidence in the trial, and your own speculation, why do you think Oscar Grant took this photograph?

Most likely he was documenting unfair treatment. He said something to his girlfriend [during the phone call], like “I’m getting beat up here.” It was a way of documenting that, and putting Mehserle on notice. If you take a picture of someone you are saying: I’m watching your behavior. You’re accountable. You are expressing your concern and putting them on notice.

(via aziaticblack)

This was posted 23 hours ago. It has 1,324 notes. .
varietyinblack:

"Nude Woman and Child on Bed"
Photograph, 1966
Bruce Davidson

varietyinblack:

"Nude Woman and Child on Bed"

Photograph, 1966

Bruce Davidson

This was posted 23 hours ago. It has 49 notes. .
knowledgeequalsblackpower:

blackourstory:

bathory-babe:

How many of you have heard Latasha Harlins?
*everyone is silent*

She was killed by Korean store owner Soon Ja Du, which set off the LA Riots. Ice Cube did a song about her called Black Korea, predicting that riot in fact. Some of us know. And no, I didn’t have to look her up. I remember. I read the Final Call.

She was murdered over a damn bottle of orange juice that store owner thought she was going to steal. There were eye witnesses and security camera footage.
The store owner still got no jail time! 
It’s not just an inconvenience to be followed around the store. You can be murdered if the store clerk decides to stand their ground.  If you’ve been followed around a store before, let Harlins tragedy serve as a reminder of why you shouldn’t go back.
Don’t spend money where you are not welcomed!

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

blackourstory:

bathory-babe:

How many of you have heard Latasha Harlins?

*everyone is silent*

She was killed by Korean store owner Soon Ja Du, which set off the LA Riots. Ice Cube did a song about her called Black Korea, predicting that riot in fact. Some of us know. And no, I didn’t have to look her up. I remember. I read the Final Call.

She was murdered over a damn bottle of orange juice that store owner thought she was going to steal. There were eye witnesses and security camera footage.

The store owner still got no jail time! 

It’s not just an inconvenience to be followed around the store. You can be murdered if the store clerk decides to stand their ground.  If you’ve been followed around a store before, let Harlins tragedy serve as a reminder of why you shouldn’t go back.

Don’t spend money where you are not welcomed!

(via femmefaery)

This was posted 1 day ago. It has 10,973 notes. .
illustratedladies:

Marcel George

illustratedladies:

Marcel George

This was posted 1 day ago. It has 97 notes. .